Podcasts

Whether you couldn't make the presentation or you really want to go back and hear it again, MIAC's lectures on Native American Arts & Culture are available here for download in MP3 format

Bruce Bernstein
This talk was recorded April 5th, 2009. "Looking into the Bowl: An Anthropologist's View of Cochiti and Santo Domingo Pottery". Bruce Bernstein is currently the Executive Director of SWAIA. From 1997 to 2005, Bernstein served as the Assistant Director for Cultural Resources at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. Previously he was the Director of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture; his directorship oversaw the building and installation of the Bloch Wing and the permanent exhibition, "Here, Now and Always." He has also held positions at the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, and the University of New Mexico's Maxwell Museum of Anthropology. He has published and curated exhibitions widely on American Indian art.


JJ Brody
This lecture was recorded March 15, 2009. "The Painted Pottery of Cochiti and Santo Domingo Pueblo". Art Historian J.J. Brody in 'A River Apart' examines and interprets the painted pottery traditions of the two neighboring communities from a perspective shaped by sixty years immersion in the history of Pueblo art. He is Professor Emeritus of University of New Mexico, from which he holds two Ph.D.s and developed the Ph.D. program in Native American Art History in the 1970s. He is well known for his wide body of articles and books, and as curator of numerous exhibits.


Native Underground - Part 2
This talk and panel discussion was recorded November 14, 2008. The artists' panel of Rory Erler Wakemup, Micah Wesley, Jak, Jacueline Smith, Sara Marie Ortiz, and Eve-Lauryn La Fountain is presented here. It was followed by a party and chance to talk one-on-one with the artists. Avant Garde's mission is to engage a younger audience in the Museums of New Meixco in a fun and educational way. Avant Garde also promotes young and emerging artists in New Mexico and beyond. Membership in Avant Garde is free to museum members.


Native Underground - Part 1
This talk and panel discussion was recorded November 14, 2008. Emerging Native American artists for Native Underground 2008; Rory Erler Wakemup, Micah Wesley, Jak, Jacueline Smith, Sara Marie Ortiz, and Eve-Lauryn La Fountain; take the stage for a panel discussion in Avant Garde's annual Native Underground hosted at MIAC. Learn how young NU artists are breaking with traditional stereotypes of art and culture. Avant Garde's mission is to engage a younger audience in the Museums of New Meixco in a fun and educational way. Avant Garde also promotes young and emerging artists in New Mexico and beyond. Membership in Avant Garde is free to museum members.


Rebecca Benes
"An Introduction to Native American PIcture Books of Change". This talk was recorded February 15, 2009 at MIAC. Native American Picture Books of Change is an exhibition and book of original works by Hopi, Navajo, Apache, and Pueblo artists who illustrated children's books in the 1920's through today. Rebecca C. Benes, co-curator of the exhibit and author of the same titled book, has explored a lifetime interest in children's literature as a gallery owner, a librarian, and as an adjunct professor of Children' s literature. She splits her time between the Denver Area and Santa Fe.


Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh
"All the Names: Locating Self and Culture in Pueblo Pottery". This lecture was recorded January 11th, 2009 at MIAC. Dr. Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh is the Curator of Anthropology for the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. Focusing principally on Native American communities in the American Southwest, Dr. Colwell-Chanthaphonh has undertaken a range of studies to examine the role of history and objects that embody history in politics, science, landscapes, museums, and heritage sites. Dr. Colwell-Chanthaphonh received his PhD and MA degrees from Indiana University.


Marcy Norton
"Chocolate Heaven and Tobacco Saints: Indian Adaptations to Colonialism in Mesoamerica." This lecture was recorded November 23, 2008. Difficult as it is to fathom, prior to Christopher Columbus's first voyage in 1492, no one outside of the Americas had ever seen, much less tasted, tobacco or chocolate. Initially dismissed as dry leaves and an exotic Indian drink, these two ingestibles would eventually permeate European culture and culinary life on a scale unsurpassed by any other New World import. In SACRED GIFTS, PROFANE PLEASURES: A History of Tobacco and Chocolate in the Atlantic World historian Marcy Norton, Ph.D., traces chocolate and tobacco's pre-Columbian origins and reveals how these two goods became material and symbolic links to the pre-Hispanic past for colonized Indians and colonizing Europeans alike.


Jason Garcia
"TEWA TALES OF SUSPENSE" This lectures was recorded November 16, 2008 in the MIAC theater. Jason Garcia is a son of noted potters Gloria Garcia (Goldenrod) and John Garcia. In 2003, Jason won his first major award, with a "Best of Division" at Santa Fe Indian Market for a set of clay tiles depicting the Franciscan Saints. In 2004, he won the prestigious "Artist's Choice Award" for a large tile depicting the Pueblo Revolt. His works are all painted with native clays slips on a native handmade clay tile. Video games, self-portraits, the Pueblo Revolt, religious icons, Pueblo dances and ceremonies, are all part of Jason's artistic world.


Comic Art Indigene Gallery Talk
This talk was recorded May 11, 2008 in the exhibit gallery. This gallery talk by exhibit curator Tony Chavarria introduces specific ideas and pieces in the show. Comic Art Indigene: This is where comics and the indigenous meet. As an art form, comics are poorly understood, underanalyzed, and under-utilized. Created to be disposable yet widely read, comics are often dismissed as primitive and juvenile. Nevertheless, a generation of Native artists has embraced comics as an expressive medium. It is only natural that this marginal art appeals to oftmarginalized indigenous people, for both have been regarded as a primitive and malignant presence on the American landscape.


Comic Art Indigene Panel Discussion
This talk and panel discussion was recorded May 11, 2008. The introductory talk by exhibit curator Tony Chavarria (MIAC Curator of Ethnology) introduces the exhibit: Comic Art Indigene is a journey into mystery in which Indian artists articulate identity, politics, and culture using the unique dynamics of comic art. This is a new world of American Indian art, full of the brash excitement first seen on newsprint a century ago - sometimes unrefined, often considered crude, but never sterile. Followed by a discussion with two of the artists in the exhibit, the artists Jolene Nenibah Yazzie (Dine) and Jason Garcia (Santa Clara Pueblo).


Ryan Huna Smith
"Native Tradition Meets Pop Culture" This lecture was recorded April 20, 2008 at the museum. This lecture was presented as a prelude to the opening of the exhibit 'Comic Art Indigene' . Ryan Huna Smith is both a well known comic and comic inspired artist and the director of the Smoki Museum of Indian Art and Culture, Prescott Az. "My current style evolved at the end of my college career. During that time I was strongly influenced by art found in comic books and Japanese animation. My desire to explore Native American culture mixed with this contemporary interest. I liked the results I had in combining exaggerated human forms and bright color."


Gaussoin Family
"The Applications of Traditional and Contemporary Styles in Jewelry and Fashion" This lecture was recorded at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in March 9, 2008. It was presented in conjunction with the exhibit 'Native Couture: A History of Santa Fe Style'. The Gaussoin family of jewelers; including Connie Tsosie Gaussion, Wayne Nez Gaussion, and David Gaussion; talk about their art and inspiration. Connie Tsosie Gaussoin, of Picuris Pueblo and Navajo heritage, is the matriarch of an extraordinarily talented family of artists all of whom are nationally respected for their skills as jewelers and artists. Inspired by the values of family but encouraged by artistic initiatives outside kinship and culture, Connie redefined her art to include modernistic ideas in metalsmithing, painting, and sculpture.


Patricia Michaels
"Naturally Native:Textiles and Fahsion" This lecture was recorded at the MIAC on Feb. 10, 2008. It was presented in conjunction with the exhibit 'Native Couture: A History of Santa Fe Style'. Fashion designer Patricia Michaels of Taos Pueblo is known for using textures that challenge modern convention and forms that differ from standard cut out patterns. She incorporates a unique vision into each of her garments. The marriage of history and this contemporary time is present in her work.


Lois Ellen Frank
Lois Ellen Frank (Nov. 18, 2007) "Feasting on Tradition: Native American Foods of the Southwest, Past and Present" This podcast was recorded on Nov. 18th, 2007 in the MIAC theater. Lois Ellen Frank, an instructor at Santa Fe School of Cooking is an award-winning chef and author. She is also a photographer, storyteller, and researcher. This included a book signing of her cookbook "Foods of the Southwest Indian Nations"