Events & Exhibitions » Current Exhibitions

Current Exhibitions

Birds: Spiritual Messengers of the Skies

 

October 20, 2018 through September 30, 2019

Please note this exhibit is at the Center for NM Archaeology, located at 7 Old Cochiti Road, off the Caja Del Rio exit of 599. Birds are among the most cherished animals with whom we share the Earth. Where birds live well, people thrive. The presence and wellbeing of birds reflects the health of the environment; they share every ecosystem with us, playing the role of hunter and prey, pollinators, scavengers, and dispersers of seeds. Feeding the spirit, they can signify strength, courage and freedom. They are companions to us and inspire us to think beyond our own confinement and limitations. With some 10,000 species of birds in the world, they represent one of the best adapted animals on Earth, dating back to the time of the dinosaurs. “Birds: Spiritual Messengers of the Skies” explores the importance of birds among Native American culture both in the past and today. It includes information on some of the major bird species of the Southwest and how important birds have been as a resource for tools, feathers and food. Birds in archaeology, how they are studied and what that tells us about the past, is also included. With help from Audubon New Mexico, the exhibit inspires to communicate important aspects of birds and their role in our world. The exhibit opens on International Archaeology Day, Saturday, October 20, at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology located off the 599 Bypass in Santa Fe at 7 Old Cochiti Road (located off Caja del Rio Road, right across from the Santa Fe Animal Shelter and Humane Society). The Center, which houses the archaeology collections for the State of New Mexico, and the Office of Archaeological Studies, who shares the building, will hold an open house from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will include tours of the facility and many activities and demonstrations for children and adults including atlatl (spear) throwing and archaeology demonstrations. The event is free of charge. Thereafter, the exhibit can be viewed in the lobby of the Center until October 2019, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (excluding holidays). This exhibit complements The Year of the Bird, the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act that was passed in 1918 to protect birds from wanton killing. The Year of the Bird is sponsored by National Geographic, the National Audubon Society, BirdLife International and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Visit any of these organizations’ sites to sign up, learn how to help protect birds, and find events near you!

Creating Tradition - at Epcot Center

 

July 27, 2018 through December 31, 2019

This special MIAC exhibition - located at Disney World’s Epcot Center (Orlando, FL) - allows visitors to explore the artistry of American Indian communities and learn about traditional Native influences. “Creating Tradition: Innovation and Change in American Indian Art” showcases authentic, historical Native artifacts alongside contemporary works of American Indian art—demonstrating examples of cultural traditions which have been handed down through generations. Native communities from 7 geographic regions across the United States are included in the gallery. Their art represents the richness, depth and diversity of Native cultures past and present. Among the featured artists with works on display are fashion designer Loren Aragon (Acoma Pueblo), noted doll-maker Glenda McKay (Ingalik-Athabascan) and Juanita Growing Thunder (Assiniboine Sioux) from the Growing Thunder family of Montana. This collection is made possible through the collaboration of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC) in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) in Washington, D.C.

What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection

 

June 3, 2018 through August 4, 2019

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC) periodically features art recently acquired through gifts or purchases. What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection, highlights the collection donated to the Museum by Carol Warren, who was a volunteer in the Collections Department for more than 20 years. The collection consists of over 200 works of art, including paintings, pottery, jewelry and textiles from some of Santa Fe’s most prominent contemporary artists. A selection of this collection will be on exhibit and will include pieces created by renowned artists such as Tony Abeyta, Tammy Garcia, Dan Namingha, and Jody Naranjo. The exhibition, co-curated by, C.L. Kieffer Nail, Antonio Chavarria, and Valerie Verzuh, will not only highlight outstanding contemporary artists, but it will also feature multigenerational artists by including work of artists within the same family that have crafted their trade alongside each other. “By displaying pieces made by related artists, we hope to demonstrate ways in which Native artists inspire each other through instruction as well as how individual artists exhibit their own identity through what is essentially a family practice,” said curator C. L. Kieffer Nail. In accepting new items, whether they were made yesterday or 12,000 years ago, museum staff consider various issues such as curatorial collecting objectives, gaps in collections, potential future use of the objects such as publication and exhibition, storage limitations and special preservation requirements. The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology collections inspire appreciation for and promote knowledge of the diverse native arts, histories, languages, and cultures of the Greater Southwest. This mission is made possible through the active acquisition of material culture that contributes to an understanding of the peoples that made them. The creative talents of Native artists in the past, present and future, give purpose to the MIAC. This is why it continues to collect and preserve art and artifacts made by tribal artists from all time periods. It endeavors to educate visitors about ancient yet living Native cultures, and provide Indian artists with examples of their ancestors’ gifts. The accessioned collections of the museum are made possible by the generosity of donors and the cultivation of such by the Museum of New Mexico Foundation and its affiliated support groups.  

Hweeldi: The Woven Tribute

 

June 1, 2018 through July 30, 2019

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC) is commemorating the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Bosque Redondo, signed June 1, 1868, by displaying an extraordinary wool rug woven in tribute to the Long Walk. Created in the early 1900s, the rug is an impressive 9 ft. by 15 ft., last displayed at MIAC in 1996. While the identity of the weavers of the piece remains unknown, Navajo oral history – and likely some first-hand accounts – informed the weavers along the way with their design.  In 1868, the Long Walk was initiated by the United States military as part of Manifest Destiny, the concept that expansion of the United States in the 1800s was both justified and inevitable. Only the 1868 treaty allowed the Navajo to return to their Diné Bikéyah (Navajo sacred lands) in northwestern New Mexico, where they rebuilt as a nation of herders, farmers, and weavers.

Maria Samora: Master of Elegance

 

April 8, 2018 through March 3, 2019

MIAC is happy to announce Maria Samora: Master of Elegance, an exhibition that showcases this year’s Museum of Indian Arts & Culture Living Treasure and Native Treasurers Featured Artist. Samora (Taos Pueblo) is known for her minimalist lines, interdisciplinary approach, and modern designs. She began apprenticing with goldsmith and master gem cutter Phil Poirer in 1998 and went on to work with him for 15 years. Since striking out on her own in 2005, her jewelry has become known for the simplicity of its design, textured metals, and combinations of both gold and silver. Stones include traditional turquoise and unexpected choices such as diamonds, guava moonstone, and African opal. The metalwork Samora has learned to incorporate are rooted in Etruscan, Greek, Egyptian, Syrian, and even Korean designs. Samora’s work will remain on display in MIAC’s Diker Gallery through February of 2019.   You may view a short documentary about Maria Samora by copying and pasting the following link. https://tinyurl.com/yd6ef9yy  

Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans

 

December 10, 2017 through June 2, 2019

The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, hunting and horse gear. These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.

Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West

 

August 27, 2017 through December 30, 2018

Footwear is evocative. It tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration, reflecting the lives of makers and wearers and offering a window into the past and the present. This exhibition features sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions; includes Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and exhibited for the first time in decades; and concludes with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses. Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017, and will be on display through the end of 2018.

The Buchsbaum Gallery of Southwestern Pottery

 

On long-term display

The Buchsbaum Gallery features each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona in a selection of pieces that represent the development of a community tradition. In addition, a changing area of the gallery, entitled Traditions Today highlights the evolving contemporary traditions of the ancient art of pottery making.

Here, Now and Always

 

On long-term display

Here, Now, and Always is a major exhibition based on eight years of collaboration among Native American elders, artists, scholars, teachers, writers and museum professionals. Voices of fifty Native Americans guide visitors through the Southwest’s indigenous communities and their challenging landscapes. More than 1,300 artifacts from the Museum’s collections are displayed accompanied by poetry, story, song and scholarly discussion.