Events & Exhibitions » Past Exhibitions

Past Exhibitions

 

Triumph TR8 in MIAC lobby
October 27, 2013 through December 30, 2013
A 1974 Triumph TRB decorated by Hopi Tewa artist Dan Namingha and nine other Native American artists is parked in the lobby of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC), a symbol of a broadened approach by the museum to create partnerships with other area institutions that share a mission in honoring and perpetuating Native art and education. Just as 10 artists collaborated to turn the car into an art piece, now MIAC is collaborating with the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) to ensure Native American students are prepared to fill positions at museums that reflect their peoples’ art and culture. Gift of Elizabeth Sackler and on view in MIAC lobby.


 

What’s New in New: Recent Acquisitions
February 17, 2013 through December 30, 2013
What’s New in New: Recent Acquisitions is the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture’s annual exhibition of new acquisitions celebrating the gallery’s namesake, Lloyd Kiva New. What’s New in New opens on Sunday, February 17, 2013 from 1 to 4 p.m. and runs through December 30, 2013. The Women’s Board of the Museum of New Mexico will serve refreshments in honor of Kiva New’s birthday anniversary. Curator Tony Chavarria’s focus with this show is on modern and contemporary Native art including paintings, monotypes, poetry, and sculpture created between 1968 and 2012.


 

They Wove for Horses: Diné Saddle Blankets
March 25, 2012 through August 18, 2013
They Wove for Horses: Diné Saddle Blankets opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on March 25, 2012 (on long-term view). The exhibition highlights both the textile-weaving proficiency of Diné weavers who produced complex saddle blankets for all occasions and the design skills of Diné silversmiths who created dazzling headstalls of silver and turquoise.The saddle blankets on exhibit date from 1860 to 2002 and are arranged by weaving methods: tapestry weave; two-faced double weave; and twill weaves of diagonal, diamond, and herringbone patterns. By using a variety of warp and weft yarns—natural wool, cotton, angora mohair, unraveled bayeta, and Germantown—weavers added individuality to the everyday and fanciful tapestries they created for horses.Horse trappings on exhibit reveal the great pride that Diné horsemen took in their horses and how they adorned them for ceremonial and social events. The Diné first learned how to manufacture saddles and bridles from neighboring cultures and their proficiency quickly surpassed that of their mentors. That devotion resonates still, as the horse remains a viable living force in Diné life today.


 

Margarete Bagshaw: Breaking the Rules
February 12, 2012 through December 30, 2012
Margarete Bagshaw: Breaking the Rules features more than 30 paintings (some on sculpted wood panels), bronze and clay as wall art and multi-colored ceramic vessels that demonstrate the breadth and multi-dimensionality of Margarete Bagshaw's work.


 

Woven Identities
November 20, 2011 through February 24, 2014
Woven Identities features baskets woven by artists representing 60 cultural groups in six culture areas of Western North America: The Southwest, Great Basin, Plateau, California, the Northwest Coast, and the Arctic.All objects tell a story, if you know the right questions to ask. At the time the baskets in this exhibition were collected little to no information was recorded; the weaver’s names are largely unknown. Nonetheless, each basket has an identity, a woven identity. The identity of each basket—where it was made; when it was made; who made it; who it was made for; why it was made—by “reading” its individual characteristics. 


 

Creative Spark! : The Life and Art of Tony Da
February 13, 2011 through December 31, 2011
Creative Spark: The Life and Art of Tony Da is the artist’s first comprehensive museum retrospective. On view will be the largest group of Da’s paintings and pottery ever gathered in one place. The exhibition opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on February 13, 2011 running through December 31, 2011.


 

Huichol Art and Culture: Balancing the World
April 11, 2010 through February 12, 2012
For the first time, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology presents a significant collection of Huichol art from the early part of the last century in Huichol Art and Culture: Balancing the World. The exhibition opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture April 11, 2010 and  has now been extended to run through February 12, 2012. There are important ties between Huichol work and Native American, prehispanic, and Hispanic art histories and cultures. Known today for colorful, decorative yarn paintings, the origins of modern Huichol art are found in the earlier Huichol religious arts of the Robert M. Zingg ethnographic collection at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture.


 

Harry Fonseca: In the Silence of Dusk
February 14, 2010 through January 2, 2011
The exhibition Harry Fonseca: In the Silence of Dusk  focuses on four series of paintings that explore the transformative and mythic forces that Fonseca perceived in himself and the world around him. The painting series include In the Silence of Dusk, Stone Poems, St. Francis of Assisi; and Seasons. While not a retrospective, the exhibition explores Fonseca’s body of work as it changes focus from stylized but representational studies based on his Native American heritage to more abstract explorations of his world to non-objective compositions celebrating color. All of the works in the exhibition are courtesy of the Harry Fonseca Trust. The exhibition opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on Sunday, February 14, 2010, 1:00-4:00 p.m. and runs through January 2, 2011.


 

Native Couture II: Innovation and Style
August 30, 2009 through February 21, 2010
Native Couture II: Innovation and Style opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on Sunday, August 30, 2009. This exhibition explores the history of Native fashion from hand-made clothing and accessories of the 1880s that influenced the development of a Santa Fe Style, to today’s contemporary Native couturiers. At its root, Indian art is the quintessential original American art. This centuries-long influence of Native American art requires the buyer, or wearer, and the American public in general to ponder the origins of a truly unique American style.


 

Native American Picture Books of Change
February 15, 2009 through January 2, 2010
Native American Picture Books of Change—is an exhibition of original works by Hopi, Navajo, Apache, and Pueblo artists who illustrated children's books in the 1920's through today. Based on the book of the same title by Rebecca Benes, the exhibition focuses on illustrations in Native American children’s books of the last century. Emerging Indian artists illustrated the stories for Indian students based on Native oral traditions and narratives about everyday Indian life.


 

A River Apart
October 19, 2008 through October 2, 2011
Two major rivers and their tributaries - the Colorado River and the Rio Grande - have shaped both the landscape and the distribution of indigenous villages. Neighboring New Mexico pueblos on the banks of the northern Rio Grande - just a river apart - the communities of Cochiti and Santo Domingo share a ceramic tradition extending back almost 1,500 years. This permanent collection - A River Apart - preserves these iconic cultural representatives.


 

Comic Art Indigène
May 11, 2008 through January 4, 2009
Comic Art Indigène looks at how storytelling has been used through comics and comic inspired art to express the contemporary Native American experience.


 

Native Couture
December 16, 2007 through April 21, 2009
Santa Fe style represents a state of mind, it is not just jewelry and clothing but a feeling inside, a sense of place and that total belief in the Navajo saying, “Walk in beauty.”


 

Spider Woman’s (NA ASHJE’II ’ASDZÁÁ) Gift
May 14, 2007 through September 2, 2007
Spider Woman’s (Na ashje’ii 'Asdzáá) Gift: Navajo Weaving Traditions, a long-term exhibition, features weavings from the 1850s through the 1890s—the Classic and Transitional periods.